Buy a Dictionary online
at Amazon
View definitions alphabetically
A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Definition of depth (Meaning of depth)
1 Definition found
Rocket Languages ? Language Learning Software Review
Depth Depth (s[e^]pth), n. [From {Deep}; akin to D. diepte,
	     Icel. d[=y]pt, d[=y]p[eth], Goth. diupi[thorn]a.]
	     1. The quality of being deep; deepness; perpendicular
	        measurement downward from the surface, or horizontal
	        measurement backward from the front; as, the depth of a
	        river; the depth of a body of troops.
	        [1913 Webster]
	
	     2. Profoundness; extent or degree of intensity; abundance;
	        completeness; as, depth of knowledge, or color.
	        [1913 Webster]
	
	              Mindful of that heavenly love
	              Which knows no end in depth or height. --Keble.
	        [1913 Webster]
	
	     3. Lowness; as, depth of sound.
	        [1913 Webster]
	
	     4. That which is deep; a deep, or the deepest, part or place;
	        the deep; the middle part; as, the depth of night, or of
	        winter.
	        [1913 Webster]
	
	              From you unclouded depth above.       --Keble.
	        [1913 Webster]
	
	              The depth closed me round about.      --Jonah ii. 5.
	        [1913 Webster]
	
	     5. (Logic) The number of simple elements which an abstract
	        conception or notion includes; the comprehension or
	        content.
	        [1913 Webster]
	
	     6. (Horology) A pair of toothed wheels which work together.
	        [R.]
	        [1913 Webster]
	
	     7. (A["e]ronautics) The perpendicular distance from the chord
	        to the farthest point of an arched surface.
	        [Webster 1913 Suppl.]
	
	     8. (Computers) the maximum number of times a type of
	        procedure is reiteratively called before the last call is
	        exited; -- of subroutines or procedures which are
	        reentrant; -- used of call stacks.
	        [PJC]
	
	     {Depth of a sail} (Naut.), the extent of a square sail from
	        the head rope to the foot rope; the length of the after
	        leach of a staysail or boom sail; -- commonly called the
	        {drop of a sail}.
	        [1913 Webster]

From The Collaborative International Dictionary of English v.0.44
Rocket Languages ? Language Learning Software Review
This word appears under the following labels